Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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4.1.3 So-called Style Disjuncts

In example (8) on p. 2 a third type of Disjunct occurs. The previous classes of Disjuncts concerned the content of the sentence (truthfulness, subjective evaluation). Breviter pertains to the way in which the speaker expresses himself. Quirk et al. (1985) call such expressions `Style Disjuncts', as opposed to the attitudinal Disjuncts of crosssection 4.1.2. In Latin such Disjuncts are commonly expressed by subordinate clauses introduced by ut, as in (7), rather than by adverbs:

(7) denique ut breviter includam quod sentio … tam intemperantes in ipsis miseriis quam sunt ante illas (`Finally, briefly to state my own opinion, they have as little self-control in the midst of their misery as before it', Sen. Ep. 98.8)

A slightly different type is formed by ut-clauses which mark the progression or the structure of the text. An example is (8):

(8) ut vero iam ad illa summa veniamus, quae vis alia potuit … homines … congregare (`To come now to those important points, what other force has been able to bring men together … ', Cic. de Orat. 1.33)

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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