Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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4.1.2 Attitudinal Disjuncts

In crosssection 4.1.1 adverbs such as fortasse, haud dubie, etc. are mentioned as adverbs which are used as sentence adverbials. They offer an indication as to the attitude of the speaker with regard to the `truthfulness' of the sentence. Apart from these adverbs, adverbs which normally function as Manner Adjuncts may also be used to express the subjective view of the speaker. Sz. (821) points out that this particularly holds for adverbs which mean `good' and `bad', and that in comparison with the modern languages the Latin expressions of this type are remarkably pregnant with meaning (from recent studies it appears, however, that this is common also in modern languages). Not only adverbs can be used in this way, but also expressions which belong to other categories, e.g. nominal groups in the ablative, as in (5) and (6):

(3) male reprehendunt (`They wrongly criticize …', Cic. Tusc. 3.34)

(4) miseram pacem vel bello bene mutari (`For unhappy peace even war is a good alternative', Tac. A. 3.44)

(5) non mea culpa … ad vos oratum mitto (`It is not my fault that I am sending ambassadors to you', Sal. Jug. 24.2)

(6) leviore flagitio legatum interficietis (`Less disgracefully you may kill an ambassador', Tac. A. 1.18)

Compare also example (7) on p. 2 (stulte).

In view of the occurrence of such – ostensibly Manner – adverbs in modern languages, it is not unlikely that in Latin, too, they occur as Disjunct; yet, up to now objective evidence (of the kind mentioned in crosssection 4.1.1) is lacking,

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apart from the (im) possibility of certain paraphrases. For instance, one could also say that mea culpa in (5) is a satellite with the syntactic function Adjunct and the semantic function Cause, and that example (5) is remarkable because this mea culpa has emphatically (Focus) been placed at the beginning of the sentence. [2]

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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