Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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Bibliographical information

A thorough investigation of the valencies of Latin verbs, and the ways to determine valency of verbs in general can be found in Happ (1976). More or less severe criticism is expressed by Bolkestein (1977a), Guiraud (1978), Serbat (1978) and Vester (1981) in their reviews of Happ's monumental study. For the notion `omissibility' see Pinkster (1972c: 76); on `expanded valency' see Korhonen (1977: 194–6). The do so test is discussed by Happ (1976: 401–10). Data relevant to this test can be found in Lodge's Lexicon Plautinum, s.v. facere, p. 590–2; TLL, s.v. facere 107.31 ff.; Thesleff (1960: 20–1). Context types in which arguments can be omitted more easily are mentioned by Happ (1976: 239–61). A statistical approach to the valency problem is provided by Greule (1982: 206–19). Valency dictionaries have been composed for German by Helbig & Schenkel (1969) and Sommerfeldt & Schreiber (1977; 1980). Favarin (1979) has a proposal for Latin.

For the notion `state of affairs' I refer the reader to Dik (1989). Lists of nuclear predications in Latin are given by Happ (1976: 548–80) and Scherer (1975: 126–45). For zero-place verbs see Rosén (1983: 195).

The semantic functions distinguished in this book are discussed in detail in Dik (1978) (he uses the label `Goal' for my term `Patient'). Recent discussion on the passive can be found in Bolkestein & Risselada (1987), Flobert (1975: 534–65) and Pinkster (1984a; 1985a).

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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