Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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Bibliographical information

The model chosen in this book for describing sentences, with its privileged position for the Predicate, is adopted from Dik (1978; 1989) and Pinkster

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(1972c). It was introduced into linguistics in a systematic way by Tesnière (1959) (a refined version of his theory can be found in Lambertz (1982)). In Latin linguistics the model has been used by Happ (1976) and Scherer (1975). In general linguistics, a number of scholars can be mentioned who present the same model, among them Chafe (1970), Halliday (1967), Helbig (1971), Korhonen (1977), Lyons (1977: 147–54; 434–8) and Matthews (1981: chapter 6). An elementary introduction is Allerton (1982). Various labels are attached to this model, for example `Valenzgrammatik' and `Dependency Grammar'. First steps in this direction can be discerned in K.–St. (I. 1–2; 250–1). The same model can be found in studies of logic (for example Allwood et al. 1977: 60).

Instead of the notions `argument' and `satellite' (taken from Dik 1978) we also find `actant' and `circonstant', respectively, in Tesnière and `Ergänzung' and `Erweiterung' or `freie Angabe' in Scherer and Happ.

For pragmatic functions in Latin the reader is referred to Bolkestein (1981a) and Panhuis (1982). The terminology used in this book is that of Dik (1989).

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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