Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect

12.3.1 Tense

We have seen in chapter 11 (p. 227) that the imperfect locates an action or state at a certain moment in the past. If an episode starts with an imperfect, the reader is led to expect that subsequently another event will be mentioned (mostly in the perfect or the historic present) as taking place against the background of the action or state in the imperfect. With regard to his background action, the new action or state (the `incident') will be interpreted in a temporal or causal/consecutive sense. If the order is reversed. the text in the imperfect will be interpreted as an elaboration or explanation of what has preceded. We have also seen that perfect forms that follow one another without being explicitly related to one another in some way are understood as successive (in this connection one might say `continuative'). Tenses, particularly the ordering of the tenses, thus give a text a certain structure, a structure which can naturally also be created by or in combination with other means. [30]

Previous Sub2Sect

Next Sub2Sect


Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
Powered by PhiloLogic