Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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9.2.3 The influence of sentence type and the distinction main sentence/subordinate clause

In some languages, such as Dutch and German, there is a difference between the position of the finite verb in main sentences and subordinate clauses. Furthermore, in interrogative and imperative sentences in such languages the finite verb occupies a different position from that in declarative sentences. As for Latin, we know that in imperative and concessive sentences the finite verb is often placed at the beginning of the sentence (for examples see Sz. 403; K.–St. II.598–9). See (11):

(11) sit fur, sit sacrilegus, sit flagitiorum omnium vitiorumque princeps; at est bonus imperator … (`Let him be a thief, a profaner, a champion of all

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crimes and disgraceful acts; yet, he is a good leader', Cic. Ver. 5.4)

The same is often the case in interrogative clauses. For subordinate clauses this is less clear. For Caesar it has been demonstrated that in subordinate clauses finite verbs are placed at the end even more often than in main sentences (Sz. 403), but this is merely a difference of degree. In other authors, too, only a small difference has been found, which need not necessarily be related to the difference main sentence: subordinate clause. [7]

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Pinkster, Harm (1942-) [1990], Latin Syntax and Semantics [info], xii, 320 p.: ill.; 24 cm. [word count] [Pinkster].
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