Charlton T. Lewis; Charles Short [1879], A Latin Dictionary; Founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary (Trustees of Tufts University, Oxford) [word count] [latindico19].
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SemproniusSemprōnĭus, i, m.; Semprōnĭa, ae, f.,

I the name of a Roman gens. Its most celebrated members were Ti. and C. Sempronius Gracchus, after whom are named the leges Semproniae (v. infra, A.); fem. Sempronia, wife of D. Junius Brutus, and sharer in Catiline's conspiracy, Sall. C. 25 and 40, 5.—Hence,

   A Semprōnĭus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Sempronius: lex frumentaria, Cic. Brut. 62, 222; id. Dom. 9, 24; id. Fam. 1, 7, 10: leges, id. Verr. 2, 5, 63, § 163; id. Phil. 1, 8, 18 et saep.: Sempronia Horrea, a place where, by a law of C. Gracchus, the public corn was stored, Fest. p. 290 Müll.; Liv. Epit. 58; 60; Flor. 3, 14 sq.; Vell. 2, 3 sqq.—

   B Semprō-nĭānus, a, um, adj., of or belonging to a Sempronius, Sempronian: senatusconsultum, introduced by C. Sempronius Rufus, Cic. Fam. 12, 29, 2: clades, suffered by the consul C. Sempronius Atratinus, Liv. 4, 43, 2.
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Charlton T. Lewis; Charles Short [1879], A Latin Dictionary; Founded on Andrews' edition of Freund's Latin dictionary (Trustees of Tufts University, Oxford) [word count] [latindico19].
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